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  • AbbVie urges U.S. court to avoid gay rights issue in HIV drug case

    An Abbott Laboratories spinoff urged a federal appeals court to revisit a ruling in a case against GlaxoSmithKline Plc, but without disturbing landmark constitutional protections for gays and lesbians. In a brief filed with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Thursday, AbbVie Inc said the full court should review an initial three-judge decision that found a gay man was improperly excluded from jury service due to his sexual orientation. The court in reaching that conclusion in January ordered a new trial for GlaxoSmithKline Plc against AbbVie, which contended Thursday that the 9th Circuit's ruling needed review due to its potential to affect "thousands of jury trials." But AbbVie said it is not asking for the court to reconsider a holding that heightened the constitutional protections judges in several Western states must now apply when evaluating laws that curtail gay rights.

  • Top Hollande aide quits in conflict of interest row

    File picture Manuel Valls, France's current Prime Minister, and Aquilino Morelle, French politician and former person in charge of the presidential program, arriving at the Elysee Palace in ParisBy Julien Ponthus and Nicholas Vinocur CLERMONT-FERRAND, France (Reuters) - A senior adviser to French President Francois Hollande quit on Friday over accusations of past conflict of interest linked to his work for pharmaceutical firms, adding to pressure on the unpopular Socialist leader weeks before European elections. Aquilino Morelle, Hollande's chief communications adviser, speechwriter and a main political strategist, has denied investigative website Mediapart's report that he had failed to obtain clearance for lobbying work when he was an employee of the public health inspectorate. The furore deals another blow to Hollande after heavy losses for his party in town hall elections at the end of March. Hollande, speaking during a visit to Clermont Ferrand in central France, said his aide had "taken the only option open to him".


  • Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury

    NEW YORK (AP) — About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body of research documenting head trauma among young offenders.

  • Clock ticking for states to adopt health exchanges

    Michelle Decker, left, an employee of Connect For Health Colorado, the state's health care exchange, explains options and procedures to Virginia and Jose Sotelo, who signed up for insurance on the last day before fines are imposed, in Denver, Monday, March. 31, 2014. Colorado has already exceeded baseline federal goals for enrollment. As of last week, 106,000 Coloradans had signed up for private insurance since the exchange opened in October. Another 151,000 had enrolled in Medicaid. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)CHICAGO (AP) — For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack Obama's health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to create their own state-run insurance exchanges.


  • Watch: Baby Can't Open Mouth in Medical Mystery

    Video shows doctors assessing Wyatt Scott's ability to swallow.

  • Baby Can’t Open Mouth in Medical Mystery

    The Scott family started a website to find out what's wrong with baby Wyatt.

  • Exclusive: Biogen prices hemophilia drug on par with older therapies

    The company's name is displayed on a billboard near the headquarters of Biogen Idec Inc. in CambridgeBiogen Idec Inc is pricing its newly approved long-acting hemophilia drug, Alprolix, to cost U.S. patients, and insurers, about the same per year as older, less convenient therapies whose price can reach about $300,000 annually. The move could pressure rivals such as Pfizer Inc to lower prices for existing hemophilia treatments, which provide patients with life-saving infusions of a blood clotting agent, according to doctors and industry analysts. Biogen last month won U.S. and Canadian approval for Alprolix to treat hemophilia B, the more rare form of the condition that affects about 4,000 people in the United States and about 25,000 worldwide. "We think we have priced (Alprolix) to create parity with existing therapies on an annual cost of therapy basis," Tony Kingsley, Biogen's head of global commercial operations, told Reuters in a telephone interview.


  • Lack of insurance tied to more emergency surgery: study

    By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The type of insurance people have is tied to their risk of needing emergency aorta surgery, according to a new study. Compared to people with private insurance, people without insurance were more likely to need emergency surgery on their aorta, the largest artery that supplies blood to every part of the body. Hughes is the study's senior author from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.

  • NJ Mumps Victims Were Vaccinated, Officials Say

    At least eight students have contacted the virus.

  • New Bill Aims to Curb Overzealous Photoshopping

    Could this mark an end to overzealous photoshopping of models?

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