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  • Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

    In this photo taken on Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, a security guard, center left, working at the University Hospital Fann, speaks to people inside a car, as a man is treated for symptoms of the Ebola virus inside the Hospital in Dakar, Senegal. The effort to contain Ebola in Senegal is “a top priority emergency,” the World Health Organization said Sunday, as the government continued tracing everyone who came in contact with a Guinean student who has tested positive for the deadly disease in the capital, Dakar. (AP Photo/Jane Hahn)DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.


  • Human Trial for Ebola Vaccine to Begin This Week

    Human Trial for Ebola Vaccine to Begin This WeekGlaxoSmithKline Makes Vaccine Stockpiles


  • Parents of seriously ill British boy resist extradition from Spain

    A Spanish National Police officer stands beside a Civil Guard's van that Naghemeh and Brett, parents of seriously ill Ashya King, 5, left in, at the Spanish High Court in MadridThe British parents who sparked a major manhunt by taking their seriously ill son out of hospital last week have asked a Spanish court not to extradite them to the United Kingdom, a judicial source said on Monday. Brett and Naghemeh King are wanted in the United Kingdom after removing their son Ashya, 5, who is suffering from a brain tumour, from Southampton General Hospital in southern England on Thursday, raising fears his life could be at risk. "They have said they don't want to be handed over to the British authorities," the source told Reuters. A panel of three judges will now have to decide whether to extradite the parents to the United Kingdom from Madrid, a process which could take weeks, said the source.


  • Pricing is key for new heart drugs challenging cheap generics

    People walk past a chemist shop at a market in MumbaiWhile new treatments on show in Barcelona are certainly moving cardiovascular medicine forward after a series of setbacks in recent years, cardiologists say that cost will be key in determining how widely they are used. “We are entering a new era of treatment and, of course, it will cost a lot of money, which is a problem,” said Michel Bertrand, emeritus professor at the University of Lille and a past president of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Hopes have spiked for a heart failure drug from Novartis and an innovative class of injectable anti-cholesterol agents known as PCSK9 inhibitors after the release of data at the ESC's annual meeting indicated that they can save more lives than standard therapies. Novartis's new heart failure drug LCZ696, for example, was tested in a pivotal trial against enalapril, a generic drug in the so-called ACE inhibitor class, a month's supply of which can be bought at Wal-Mart stores for only $4.


  • Poor response to Ebola causing needless deaths: World Bank head

    World Bank President Jim Yong Kim addresses the U.S.-Africa Business Forum in WashingtonBy Daniel Flynn and Tim Cocks DAKAR/LAGOS (Reuters) - The world's "disastrously inadequate response" to West Africa's Ebola outbreak means many people are dying who could easily be saved, the head of the World Bank said on Monday, as Nigeria confirmed another case of the highly contagious virus. In a newspaper editorial, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim said Western healthcare facilities would easily be able to contain the disease, and he urged wealthy nations to share knowledge and resources to help African countries tackle it. ...


  • Parents of ill UK boy fight extradition from Spain

    Ashya King parents's lawyer, Juan Isidro Fernandez Diaz, arrives at the National court in Madrid, Spain, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. A critically-ill 5-year-old boy driven to Spain by his parents, Brett and Naghemeh, against doctors' advice is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)LONDON (AP) — The parents of a child suffering from a severe brain tumor signaled Monday they would defy efforts to force them to return to Britain, days after their family fled to seek a novel kind of radiation treatment for the 5-year-old boy.


  • Drama of mother starving baby grips Venice fest

    Director Saverio Costanzo and cast member Alba Rohrwacher attend the red carpet for the movie "Hungry Hearts" at the 71st Venice Film FestivalBy Michael Roddy VENICE (Reuters) - A film portraying New York City mother who starves her baby because she thinks he is saint-like and food contains impurities has caused a stir at the Venice Film Festival for its switch from light romance to painful psychosis. "Hungry Hearts", by Italian director Saverio Costanzo, is one of two Italian films shown so far this week that are among 20 films competing for the top Golden Lion award at the world's oldest film festival. It stars Adam Driver, who will be in the next "Star Wars" series, and Italian actress Alba Rohrwacher as his wife. The film, which was shot for a budget of under 1 million euros ($1.3 million), starts off in rom-com style when Driver's character Jude, who works as an engineer, and Rohrwacher's Mina, who works at the Italian embassy, are both accidentally locked in the toilet of a Chinese restaurant.


  • Ebola health workers should get danger money, expert says

    Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare themselves before to carrying an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaBy Misha Hussain DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Doctors and nurses fighting the world's biggest outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa should get incentives including better pay, insurance and access to the new Ebola drug ZMapp, an international health expert said. The hemorrhagic fever, spread through the blood, sweat and vomit of the sick, has killed more than 1,550 people since March, including more than 120 health workers. Johan von Schreeb, who has traveled to the region to advise officials on how to manage the deadly epidemic, said if health workers were not protected and remunerated for their dangerous work, they could not be expected to report for duty. "Modern mobile phone technology can be used to track who is coming to work as well as transferring money directly so they can be paid on a performance-based system on top of their normal salaries," he told Thomson Reuters Foundation from Sierra Leone, where he is providing technical support for the outbreak.


  • Exercise to reap the heart-health benefits of wine, study says

    Exercise to reap the heart-health benefits of wine, study saysAt the European Society of Cardiology Congress, researchers from the Czech Republic presented a first of its kind study in which they concluded that wine has its greatest cardiovascular benefits for those who exercise. "This is the first randomised trial comparing the effects of red and white wine on markers of atherosclerosis in people at mild to moderate risk of CVD," says Professor Milos Taborsky, Director of the Internal Cardiology Clinic of the University Hospital and Palacky University in Olomouc. "We found that moderate wine drinking was only protective in people who exercised. Red and white wine produced the same results."


  • Pistachios may help reduce diabetes risk: study

    Pistachios are seen after sorting at a processing factory in RafsanjanBy Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For people who may be headed for type 2 diabetes, regularly eating pistachios might help turn the tide, according to a new trial from Spain. People with so-called prediabetes have blood sugar levels higher than normal but not yet in the diabetes range. If they do nothing, 15 to 30 percent will develop diabetes within five years, according to the U.S. In the new Spanish study, people with prediabetes who ate about two ounces of pistachios daily showed significant drops in blood sugar and insulin levels and improvements in insulin and glucose processing.


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